Priligy online now, save money
Wind Power

Pickens Plan Gives Up on Wind Power

grounded-turbine

Wind energy's one-time champion, T. Boone Pickens, who was going to "save America" with his plan for a new energy future and the best site where to buy cialis reduction of the demand for foreign oil, has given up on wind power.

The "Pickens Plan" was going to be based on the increased use of natural gas in combination with extensive wind farms for electrical generation. But now, the wind leg of the plan has been taken out, and Pickens is concentrating solely on advocating for increased use of natural gas. Pickens had already scaled back the wind side of his plan, but this is the final blow (if you'll excuse the pun).

Pickens had ordered hundreds of wind turbines for his failed plan for a huge wind farm in Texas which was unable to wow look it price cialis gain regulatory approval for the necessary transmission lines. Those turbines are now likely to http://ojalafilms.com/discount-generic-cialis end up going to wind farms in Canada, where the look here viagra medication business climate for wind is where to order cialis online better.

via: Marketplace

image: CC 2.0 by Loozrboy

 

Wind Turbines Could Help Surrounding Crops

wind-farm-crops
We've already heard about how offshore wind turbines can help sustain sea life, but it looks like wind turbines can also help plant life on dry land.  Researchers from the U.S. Energy Department's Ames Laboratory have concluded a months-long study that shows that wind turbines may benefit surrounding crops.

The purpose of the best place discount generic levitra the study was to see if wind farms in rural farmlands have any impact on how to buy viagra for cheap the crops growing nearby and, amazingly, it turns out that the turbines could benefit crops in a few ways.  The turbines direct airflow downward towards the crops, creating an increase in air turbulence, which can help the crops stay cooler on hot days and warmer on cold nights.  In the spring and fall, this would keep a more constant temperature around the crops, helping to prevent a frost and extend the growing season.

The extra turbulence also could help dry dew that settles on plants and keeping the buy tramadol with a check plants dry would reduce the potential for fungi or toxins to grow on leaves.  That saves farmers from having to artificially dry crops.

The third benefit from the added air turbulence could be an amping up of the CO2 extraction process by the plants.  The airflow could also pump extra CO2 from the soil, facilitating photosynthesis.

The researchers think these benefits will mostly be subtle, but in years where temperatures are more extreme, the benefits could be significant.

via Physorg

 

Rhode Island Wind Farm Plans Double in Size

rhode-island-wind-farm
A large Rhode Island wind farm project called the Deepwater Wind Energy Center has just gotten bigger.  Deepwater Wind has announced that the project size has now more than doubled from a 100-turbine, 350-MW project, to a 200-turbine, 1,000-MW project!  That makes it one of the largest offshore wind projects in the world.

Deepwater Wind says that the new scope of the project will increase the cost of building it to $6 billion, but that the cost of the electricity will go down.  The previous plan had utility National Grid paying 24.4. cents per kWh, but the new plan will lower the cialis 50 mg tablets price to the mid-teens per kWh, more in line with the Cape Wind agreement that will cost them 18.7 cents per kWh.

The wind farm will be located 18 miles off Rhode Island in the Rhode Island Sound and will include transmission cables from Massachusetts to viagra in india New York.  If all goes well for the wind farm and construction goes quickly, it may even beat Cape Wind to be the first offshore wind farm in America.

via Treehugger

Image via Deepwater Wind

 

South Korea Building 2.5 GW Offshore Wind Farm

south-korea-wind
South Korea is entering the offshore wind power game with quite an impressive first play.  The 2.5 GW project will cost about $8.2 billion to build.

The wind farm will be built off the southwestern coast of South Korea will include about 500 turbines and look there branded viagra is expected to be completed by 2019.  Companies like Hyundai Heavy Industries and Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering are constructing the turbines.  The government is coordinating the viagra in canada project and putting up a large chunk of the price, but private investors will need to finance the remainder.

The purpose of the wind farm isn't just to add renewable energy to South Korea's grid, but to cheapest online viagra give some of www.expert-nett.fr the area's machinery makers (like Samsung, Hyundai and Daewoo) experience in building wind farms so that South Korea can become a major wind turbine exporter.

The government has committed to a five-year plan that will see it investing $36 billion in renewable energy to help it to become more energy independent and to stake its claim in the renewable energy market.

via Physorg

 

Should Wind Turbines Be Purple?

turbines-purple
While wind turbines are, for the most part, highly beneficial to the environment, they do pose a danger to creatures who spend time in the air, namely bugs, birds and bats.  A new study published in the European Journal of Wildlife Research concludes that this danger could be solved with a little paint.

White seems like an appropriately benign color for something that will hopefully soon be dotting horizons across the country and viagra brand the world, but the study states that white and light gray turbine blades (the most common colors) attract bugs, which often leads the birds and bats that eat them to their doom. While white, light gray and yellow were most attractive, the least attractive color was purple.

The researchers were surprised by just how profoundly the insects reacted to the different colors, both during day and night.  While this doesn't mean that all turbines should now be painted a bright shade of purple, it does indicate that something as simple as a change in color could have a large impact on the amount of birds and bats that fly into wind turbines.

With that said, the researchers also suspect that the heat from the turbines could be attracting the bugs and that bats may not be able to detect them with echolocation, both of which could contribute to the problem.

via BBC

 
Start   Prev   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10   Next   End

Page 10 of 52

Are you an EcoGeek?

We've got to keep 7 billion people happy without destroying our planet. It's the biggest challenge we've ever faced....but we're taking it on. Are you with us?