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Ontario Completely Off Coal

The Canadian province of Ontario has officially shut down its last coal burning power plant.

Power for the province now comes from "emission-free electricity sources like wind, solar, nuclear and hydropower, along with lower-emission electricity sources like natural gas and biomass." The province had set a target of the wow look it sales cialis end of 2014 to end its use of http://amarragessansfrontieres.com/levitra-from-india coal to generate electricity.

The Thunder Bay Generating Station was the last coal fueled power plant in the province. Now that it has burned the last of its coal supply, the plant will be converted to a biomass-fueled power plant.

image: CC 2.0 by Kyle MacKenzie

Hat tip to 20mg cialis @TomMatzzie

 

Recycling CDs for Wastewater Treatment

Someone has finally come up with an upcycling use for old CD discs. Din Ping Tsai, a physicist at National Taiwan University, has developed a small, low-power method for treating wastewater using UV light and zinc oxide applied to the CDs. Using old CDs as a substrate to coat with zinc oxide provides a low cost layer which can be spun as water is applied, creating a thin film of water which more effectively interacts with the photocatalytic layer of zinc oxide nanorods. In tests, the device was able to break down over 95% of the contaminants after an hour of treatment.

Though this could be a wonderful application for old CDs, it's unlikely to solve the waste accumulation from billions of old CDs. The number used for this treatment system, even if it becomes widely adopted, is going to be a tiny fraction of the total production of generic cialis online CDs (which, at present is about 20 billion CDs per year).

"The spinning disk reactor is small, consumes little power, and processes contaminated water more efficiently than other photocatalytic wastewater treatment methods, Tsai says. The device could be used on a small scale to clean water contaminated with domestic sewage, urban run-off, industrial effluents, and farm waste. Going forward, the team is also working on ways to price cialis increase the www.adime.es efficiency of the reactor, and Tsai estimates that the system could soon be improved to work even faster, perhaps by creating layers of stacked disks."

While the system seems best suited to small installations, rather than big, municipal facilities, it is nevertheless an interesting system, and the ability to also deal with an e-waste issue at the same time as creating equipment for effective wastewater treatemt is a positive synergy.

via: Treehugger

 

EPA Labels for Used Cars

The new car market has had labels to inform prospective buyers of the relative efficiencies of different vehicles. Now, the EPA is making that same information more readily available to used car buyers and sellers.  Cars dating back to 1984 will be able to be identified through this system.

The used car labels are based on cialis soft tabs the original new car data, so declines that have occurred over time will not be reflected. But the baseline for comparison should still be valid. According to where do you get viagra from the EPA, "As a vehicle's fuel economy changes very little over a typical 15-year life with proper maintenance, the original EPA fuel economy estimate remains the www.gallin.fr best indicator of a used vehicle's average gas mileage."

The many millions of buyers who do not buy new cars directly from the manufacturer will now have an easier time as they consider the fuel efficiency and the carbon emissions of viagra online purchase the vehicles they are looking at. Even if a particular seller doesn't offer the information themselves, the EPA fuel economy website is simple enough that a buyer could quickly look up the information about a particular model of car they were considering.

via: EERE News

 

Ecuador Ends Novel Plan to Save Rainforest

After several years of trying to protect one of the most undeveloped parts of the Amazonian rainforest, Ecuador has ended an attempt to get the rest of the world to contribute money to offset that nation's need to exploit the region for its oil wealth. The Yasuni National Park is an incredibly biodiverse, undeveloped region in eastern Ecuador, on the border of Peru. The park comprises an area of canadian pharmacy cialis generic 9,820 square kilometers (3,792 sq. miles) in the headwaters of the Amazon. There are also an estimated 800 million barrels of crude oil in the region.

As with conservation land trusts, and carbon offsets, and similar kinds of preservation efforts, the government of Ecuador sought payment equal to buy cheapest viagra half of the oil's commercial value ($3.6 billion in 2007) in exchange for leaving it untouched and remaining in the ground. Not only would that prevent the cheap levitra canada damage that development of the region for oil production would cause, but it would also help to sequester that volume of http://meivending.com/levitra-india oil from eventually adding to the growing amount of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

To date, there has been little support for this initiative. Only a tiny portion ($6.5 million) of the money that Ecuador sought has been offered, so President Rafael Correa has now announced an end to the program:

President Correa said scrapping the program was one of the hardest decisions of his presidency. "The real dilemma is this," he said in a televised address last week. "Do we protect 100 percent of the Yasuní and have no resources to meet the urgent needs of our people, or do we save 99 percent of it and have $18 billion to fight poverty?"

While the premise seemed to make good sense from a global perspective, its timing couldn't have been worse; the proposal was begun in 2007, just as the financial crises triggering the Great Recession were flaring up. This shouldn't necessarily be read as a failure of the approach in general, but rather a first, grand-scale attempt that didn't work out. Hopefully there will be future attempts like this, and they will have better results.

image: CC BY 3.0 by Jorge.kike.medina/Wikimedia Commons

via: NPR - Planet Money

 

New Seawater Desalinating Process in Development

In general, removing salts from water is an expensive, energy intensive process. But a team of chemists at the University of supportmichaelocc.ca Texas at Austin and link for you buy now levitra the University of Marburg in Germany are developing a new method to www.soulard.org produce freshwater from briny that doesn’t involve reverse osmosis or thermal desalination. A small electrical field does the trick.

As UT Austin states, researchers apply 3.0 volts to a plastic chip filled with seawater. The chip has a microchannel with two branches, and an electrode placed at the fork. The electrode neutralizes some of the chloride ions in the water, changing the electric field nearby by creating an “ion depletion zone.” This funnels the viagra 50mg salts into one branch, leaving the desalinated water to flow into the other.

Electrochemically mediated seawater desalination, as it’s called, is in the early stages of development. The prototype chip only removes about 25 percent of salts from water in testing and only produces about 40 nanoliters of desalinated water per minute. The chemists developing this technology say that with further research this can be scaled up from its current nanoscale size and 99 percent desalination--the amount necessary to produce drinking water--may be achieved.

via: TreeHugger

image via University of Texas at Austin

 
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