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Nevada Home to World's First Hybrid Solar-Geothermal Plant


Nevada's Stillwater geothermal plant has added a solar array to become the www.auburg.de world's first hybrid solar-geothermal plant. Enel Green Power North America installed more than 89,000 solar panels with a capacity of 26 MW to the site. The plant's combined capacity is now 59 MW of clean energy capable of powering more than 50,000 homes.

Solar and geothermal are a match made in heaven. Both are great sources of clean energy, but solar power needs a backup for when the sun isn't shining (whether nighttime or a cloudy day). That's where geothermal is a great partner. It's a consistent form of energy that can smooth out the gaps in solar power and during the day when demand is ultram to buy greatest, you have the benefit of receiving power from both sources.

The project received $40 million in tax support from the Department of geniune viagra Energy through the levitra online uk Recovery Act. Stillwater is one of 14 geothermal sites in Nevada and Utah that received investments from the DOE to accelerate geothermal power development.

DOE Secretary Steven Chu says “As the first of its kind in the world, this project demonstrates how we can tap renewable energy sources to provide clean power for American families and businesses and deploy every available source of American energy."

via DOE

Image via Nevada State Office of Energy

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written by gas processing, May 21, 2012
"Capable of powering more than 50,000 homes" Now this looks pretty amazing stats.
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written by Net97surferx, May 21, 2012
Still do not see why we need giant solar farms instead of installing solar on every rooftop in America. Yes, there are methods to still charge monthly (upkeep, etc.) and still have alternative methods like this geothermal method or wind or...

Just seems that 'farm' generation is still looking at the problem from a 'last century' view of mega power stations instead of 'something better (smarter)'.
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written by gurjeet, May 22, 2012
deploy every available source of American energy."
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written by Stefan Klakovich, May 25, 2012
I completely agree with Net97surferx about large solar farms. I know many people against them because of pfizer viagra cheap habitat degradation. We already have roofs all over and there are many advantages to a fully decentralized energy system. I would like to cheapest levitra prices see much more geothermal but have all government subsidies for solar go toward small scale projects.
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End the Corporate Welfare state, subsidize the people directly.
written by Logan, May 25, 2012
More Big Business Subsidies, isn't that special? smilies/tongue.gif

Net97surferx is right, we should be focusing on putting panels on every home. As well as Piezoelectric arrays to capture energy from wind, rain, and snow.

And why doesn't every house have it's very own cooling tower?

No, instead we have to focus on www.bm-cultura.de Corporate welfare.
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written by Marci, May 25, 2012
I agree in many ways with net97surferx.

When I decided I had to refinance my house to put up solar panels, I had a dormer roof front and back and www.beverly.org it wouldn't have been suitable. I could have had the ugly panels on poles in my backyard, but I came up with a better solution. My old deck was falling apart. I had a deck built with a roof for the panels. The first solar installer that I was going to go with had slightly larger solar panels. I had to switch to another installer because the best prices for propecia first one couldn't get it done before the end of December 2009. I wished I had realized it because I could have accommodated 20, instead of the 18 panels that I got. My net meter is only about 2000kwh higher than it was on 3/17/10 (after the twin blizzards we had in February finally melted off). If I go chasing phantom energy use, I will probably be able to www.barefootfoundation.com get it even lower. With tax credits, the state grant and SREC sales, not to mention money not paid to my local electric company, it has nearly paid for itself already (well the installation not the deck-- that will probably take a decade or more to re-coop, but I have a nice Ipe deck to enjoy and hope to put up some retractable clothes lines to dry laundry during the warmer months.

New rental installations make the idea of having most rooftops covered a real possiblity. But I agree about things like geothermal as a steady back-up. I'm not there yet myself. But if I win a lottery, I will be.

I also think that more thought has to http://robert-alonso-photos.com/legal-pharmacy-online be given to building more partially earth sheltered houses. I went to Cornell University in the '70's and the discount viagra the usa Campus Store was mostly earth sheltered. You get the building, the energy savings and still have green space.
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written by Marci, May 25, 2012
I have to agree in many ways with net97surferx about rooftop installations.

When I decided I had to refinance my house to put up solar panels, I had a dormer roof front and back and it wouldn't have been suitable. I could have had the ugly panels on poles, but I came up with a better solution. My old deck was falling apart. I had a deck built with a roof for the panels. The first solar installer that I was going to go with had slightly larger solar panels. I had to switch to another installer because the first one couldn't get it done before the end of December 2009. I wished I had realized it because I could have accommodated 20, instead of the 18 panels that I got. My net meter is only about 2000kwh higher than it was on 3/17/10 (after the twin blizzards we had in February finally melted off). If I go chasing phantom energy use, I will probably be able to get it even lower. With tax credits, the state grant and SREC sales, not to mention money not paid to my local electric company, it has nearly paid for itself already (well the installation not the deck-- that will probably take a decade or more to re-coop, but I have a nice Ipe deck to enjoy and hope to put up some retractable clothes lines to dry laundry during the warmer months.

New rental installations make the idea of having most rooftops covered a real possiblity. But I agree about things like geothermal as a steady back-up. I'm not there yet myself. But if I win a lottery, I will be.

I also think that more thought has to be given to building more partially earth sheltered houses. I went to Cornell University in the '70's and the Campus Store was mostly earth sheltered. You get the building, the energy savings and still have green space.
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Roof Top Solar
written by William Carr, June 01, 2012
"Still do not see why we need giant solar farms instead of installing solar on every rooftop in America."

Because of cost efficiency.

If WalMart rents out their rooftops for a solar farm, that's efficient, and it also cools the roof so their A/C bill goes down.

If you put a dozen panels on your house, you don't have the buying power of the big boys. You can't pay them a million bucks to get a 10% discount.

Your house may have trees around it; that's not a problem with solar farms, but it will cut into your efficiency, unless you go crazy with a chainsaw.

Your excess power feeds back to the grid, but you can't bargain with the power company to get a better rate: you take what they give you, and that's IF your State has Net Metering.

And of course, you have to have it set up to sever from the AC line in the case of a power outage, or you could end up electrocuting a lineman.

All of buy discount cialis online which is no problem doing on a large scale efficiently. But it costs more per watt to http://donpablo.nl/what-is-levitra-professional do on the small scale.

You can improve your numbers by rewiring your house to also use DC; that way you won't have conversion losses. And if you really are into it, you can put in a battery bank; but for that you need Gel Cells, and a battery management system.

Bigger is better, in the power game.

That being said, we need all the power we can get. Any business with a big enough roof should be doing this.

Any homeowner with faith in the future and a clear southern approach should think about it.

But solar farms are a better way to go. Especially Concentrating Solar, that doesn't use photovoltaic panels.
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written by Graham, June 25, 2012
Stillwater is one of 14 geothermal sites in Nevada and Utah that received investments from the DOE to accelerate geothermal power development.

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